1st paragraph Op-Ed summary

Watson, Margaux. “Diversity: Why Is TV so White?” Diversity: Why Is TV so White? Entertainment Weekly, 13 June 20088. Web. 18 Sept. 2015.

Entertainment weekly writers, Margeaux Watson and Jennifer Armstrong, in their Op-Ed “Diversity: Why is TV so white?” ,argue that the television show, “The Cleveland Show,” having the main role as an African American male being voiced by a white man, is the only minority character to anchor a series on the Big Five networks in 2008-2009. They support their claim by providing an example of how proud Cleveland Brown is of his African-American heritage, and his story involving how a black bowling ball might feel when surrounded by white pins. The two then proceed to show that networks need to ensure that even their cartoons of color count, however after making an effort towards more diversity, they began to lose focus into the idea, not just involving African Americans. Finally, they break it down to show that the broadcast networks are whiter than the Caucasian percentage of 66.2 percent of the United States population, while the Latino percentage is considerably lower than the 15.2 percent.

Watson and Armstrong’s purpose is to convey that there should be a massive change within the diversity that’s being broadcast-ed in order to bring attention to shows and cartoons such as Cleveland Brown, to those who may not realize the big controversy. In the very end of their article they use concession and rebuttal by saying that one could argue that a third of those working in Hollywood should be a minority and then rebuts it by stating they aren’t accurately on air and for the most part, their stories don’t exist. They use a lot of examples for the attention of the directors and cast members.

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